Your weather just got better.

  



INDOT wants you and your family to stay safe on the roads this winter.  By following these tips and advice, you’ll be ready for winter driving.  And don’t forget:  Ice and Snow, Take it Slow!

Be Prepared!

  • Knowledge:  Before leaving home, find out about the driving conditions.  Safe drivers know the weather, and their limits.  If the weather is bad remember, Ice and Snow, Take it Slow, or just don’t go.
  • Clear:  Remove any snow on your vehicle’s windows, lights, brake lights and signals.  Make sure you can see and be seen.
  • Inspect:  Check your vehicle’s tires, wiper blades, fluids, lights, belts and hoses.  A breakdown is bad on a good day and dangerous on a bad-weather day.
  • Time:  Leave plenty of time to reach your destination safely.  It’s not worth putting yourself and others in a dangerous situation just to be on time.

Caution: Slippery When Wet!

When driving in winter weather, watch out!  Mother Nature has some tricks up her sleeve in the winter.  Here are some to be on the look out for:

  • First Snow or Ice:  Drivers often aren’t prepared for winter driving and forget to take it slow.  Remember to drive well below the posted speed limit and leave plenty of room between cars.
  • Black Ice:  Roads that seem dry may actually be slippery – and dangerous.  Take it slow when approaching intersections, off-ramps, bridges or shady areas – all are hot spots for black ice.  Remember, Ice and Snow, Take it Slow.
  • Limited Visibility: Stay attentive and reduce speed.  Know what’s going on around you.
  • Four-Wheel Drive:  On snow and ice, go slowly, no matter what type of vehicle you drive.  Even if you have an SUV with four-wheel drive you may not be able to stop any faster, or maintain control any better, once you lose traction.  Four-wheel drive may get you going faster, but it won’t help you stop sooner.

Staying Safe Around Snowplows

In the winter, INDOT snowplow drivers are out on the roads to keep them clear of snow and ice and keep you safe.  Here’s what you need to know about driving around snowplows:

  • Distance:  Give snowplows room to work.  The plows are wide and can cross the centerline or shoulder.  Don’t tailgate and try not to pass.  If you must pass, take extreme caution and beware of the snow cloud.
  • Speed:  Snowplows travel below the posted speed limit.  Be patient.  Allow plenty of time to slow down.  Remember, Ice and Snow, Take it Slow.
  • Vision:  A snowplow operator’s field of vision is restricted.  You may see them, but they don’t always see you.  Keep your distance and watch for sudden stops or turns.

Proceed with Caution!

  • Speed:  The faster you’re going, the longer it will take to stop.  When accelerating on snow or ice, take it slow to avoid slipping or sliding.  Ice and Snow, Take it Slow.
  • Distance:  Give yourself space.  It takes extra time and extra distance to bring your car to a stop on slick and snowy roads.  Leave extra room between you and the vehicle in front of you.
  • Brake:  Brake early, brake slowly, brake correctly and never slam on the brakes.  If you have anti-lock brakes, press the pedal down firmly and hold it.  If you don’t have anti-lock brakes, gently pump the pedal.  Either way, give yourself plenty of room to stop.
  • Control:  When driving on ice and snow, do not use cruise control and avoid abrupt steering maneuvers.  When merging into traffic, take it slow.  Sudden movements can cause your vehicle to slide.
  • Vision:  Be aware of what’s going on well ahead of you.  Actions by other vehicles will alert you to problems more quickly, and give you that split-second of extra time to react safely.

 

 

 


 

 

This is Home For School Closing & Delays

Winter Weather Warnings, Watches and Advisories

Winter weather related Warnings, Watches and Advisories are issued by your local National Weather Service office. Each office knows the local area and will issue Warnings, Watches or Advisories based on local criteria. For example, the amount of snow that triggers a “Winter Storm Warning” in the Northern Plains is typically much higher than the amount needed to trigger a “Winter Storm Warning” in the Southeast.

Warnings: Take Action!
  • Blizzard Warnings are issued for frequent gusts greater than or equal to 35 mph accompanied by falling and/or blowing snow, frequently reducing visibility to less than 1/4 mile for three hours or more. A Blizzard Warning means severe winter weather conditions are expected or occurring. Falling and blowing snow with strong winds and poor visibilities are likely, leading to whiteout conditions making travel extremely difficult. Do not travel. If you must travel, have a winter survival kit with you. If you get stranded, stay with your vehicle and wait for help to arrive.
  • Winter Storm Warnings are issued for a significant winter weather event including snow, ice, sleet or blowing snow or a combination of these hazards.  Travel will become difficult or impossible in some situations. Delay your travel plans until conditions improve.
  • Ice Storm Warnings are usually issued for ice accumulation of around 1/4 inch or more. This amount of ice accumulation will make travel dangerous or impossible and likely lead to snapped power lines and falling tree branches. Travel is strongly discouraged.
  • Wind Chill Warning are issued for a combination of very cold air and strong winds that will create dangerously low wind chill values. This level of wind chill will result in frostbite and lead to hypothermia if precautions are not taken. Avoid going outdoors and wear warm protective clothing if you must venture outside. See the NWS Wind Chill Chart.
  • Lake Effect Snow Warnings are issued when widespread or localized lake induced snow squalls or heavy showers are expected to produce significant snowfall accumulation. Lake effect snow usually develops in narrow bands and impacts a limited area. These bands can produce very heavy snow with sudden restrictions in visibility. Driving conditions may become hazardous at times.

Watches: Be Prepared
  • Blizzard Watches are issued when there is a potential for falling and/or blowing snow with strong winds and extremely poor visibilities. This can lead to whiteout conditions and make travel very dangerous.
  • Winter Storm Watches are issued when conditions are favorable for a significant winter storm event (heavy sleet, heavy snow, ice storm, heavy snow and blowing snow or a combination of events.)
  • Wind Chill Watches are issued when there is the potential for a combination of extremely cold air and strong winds to create dangerously low wind chill values. See the NWS Wind Chill Chart.
  • Lake Effect Snow Watches are issued when conditions are favorable for a lake effect snow event. A potential exists for heavy accumulation of lake effect snow. Travel and commerce may be significantly affected.

Advisories: Be Aware
  • Winter Weather Advisories are issued when snow, blowing snow, ice, sleet, or a combination of these wintry elements is expected but conditions should not be hazardous enough to meet warning criteria.  Be prepared for winter driving conditions and possible travel difficulties. Use caution when driving.
  • Freezing Rain Advisories are issued when light ice accumulation (freezing rain and/or freezing drizzle) is expected but will not reach warning criteria. Expect a glaze on roads resulting in hazardous travel. Slow down and use caution while driving because even trace amounts of ice on roads can be dangerous.
  • Wind Chill Advisories are issued when low wind chill temperatures are expected but will not reach local warning criteria. Extremely cold air and strong winds will combine to generate low wind chill readings. If you must venture outdoors, take precautions against frostbite and hypothermia. See the NWS Wind Chill Chart.
  • Lake Effect Snow Advisory are issued for widespread or localized lake effect snowfall accumulation (and blowing snow) remaining below warning criteria. Expects lake effect snow showers and assume travel will be difficult in some areas. Some localized snow bands will be intense enough to produce several inches in a few areas with sudden restrictions in visibility.


Here are some more key terms to understand:
  • Freezing Rain: Rain that freezes when it hits the ground; creating a coating of ice on roads, walkways, trees and power lines.
  • Sleet: Rain that turns to ice pellets before reaching the ground. Sleet also causes moisture on roads to freeze and become slippery.
  • Wind Chill: A measure of how cold people feel due to the combined effect of wind and cold temperatures; the Wind chill Index is based on the rate of heat loss from exposed skin. Both cold temperatures and wind remove heat from the body; as the wind speed increases during cold conditions, a body loses heat more quickly. Eventually, the internal body temperature also falls and hypothermia can develop. Animals also feel the effects of wind chill; but inanimate objects, such as vehicles and buildings, do not. They will only cool to the actual air temperature, although much faster during windy conditions. Read how the Wind Chill Index was developed.